Spun Out (Blacktop Cowboys) – book review

Spun Out
by Lorelei James
Release Date:  November 5, 2019
Publisher:  Berkley
Book #10 in the Blacktop Cowboys series
Number of pages:  330
Kindle Edition
Source: borrowed from MCL
Contemporary Romance
Ages 18 and Up
CW: suicide and attempted suicide

Years in the Army equipped Bailey Masterson for many things: target shooting, rappelling off cliffs, dodging grenades. She’s lived through horrors that still give her nightmares. But nothing in Bailey’s life-or-death training prepared her for caring for the tiny terror that is five-year-old Olivia Hale. Or how to control her raging attraction to Olivia’s father, Streeter, the rugged, green-eyed cattle rancher who undermines her every move even when he stars in her dreams.

Streeter Hale has room for only two things in his life: his daughter and his job. He doesn’t date. He doesn’t get attached. Not anymore. So not only is Streeter stunned by Olivia’s improved behavior after just a few days with Bailey, he’s downright floored by his immediate attraction to the woman. But with secrets in her eyes and a body that doesn’t quit, Streeter begins to worry that Bailey Masterson might just be the one woman to heal his fractured family and broken heart.

One thing’s for sure–these two wrecked souls are spinning out of control as they desperately try not to fall in love…

Okay, I really need to get better at keeping up on my favorite authors. When I read book 9 in this series, Racked and Stacked, I lamented waiting so long to read that one. This is a direct quote from my review of that book…

The next book in this series is out in a few months. Let’s hope I don’t let so much time slip away before I get my hands on it, I just adore this author and her characters.

That was almost two years ago! And once again, Lorelei James sucked me into the world of Muddy Gap and I’m sitting here wondering why it took me so long to read this book.

There are so many things I love about this story. Bailey is so matter of fact and blunt when it comes to her observations and feelings. Streeter is very reserved and, while everyone at Split Rock seems to like and respect him, nobody really knows much about him. There are a lot of reason for this that I won’t get into so as to allow you to unfold this story on your own. Just know that Streeter is a great guy. He has always and will always do what is best for his daughter no matter what. His overwhelming need to protect Olivia and keep from having to answer potential questions about her mom have made him a bit of a loner.

When Bailey and Streeter meet, they don’t necessarily like each other, but neither can deny their attraction. Time and time again they are meeting under not-so-great circumstances, snipping at each other and purposely pushing each other’s buttons. The sass they have eventually turns to flirting, and then more.

This story deals with different levels of post-partum depression along with other mental health issues. I appreciate the author delving a bit into the difficulties of having a newborn, be it your first or your fourth. Being overwhelmed doesn’t always mean you’re depressed, and showing a happy face and seeming to have it all together doesn’t mean you’re not depressed.

Watching Streeter and Bailey fall in love and learn to deal with their demons was a joy as well as emotional. The innocence Streeter initially had was sweet and his insecurities really melted my heart. The confident, sexual, adventurous person he becomes melted my panties. Both are good things, in my opinion. I’m so glad I finally got around to reading this story.

5 stars

About Cheri

I'm the mom of two boys and wife to my high school sweetheart. Our oldest, Josh, is living at home while working and paying off student loans. Our youngest, Griffin recently left his active duty Army job and is now National Guard here at home. He moved back to Michigan with his wife Kirsten and our beautiful granddaughter Hazel. I work part time and try to fit as much reading into my life as possible.
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